You are here: Home View More News and Highlights Addressing Food Price Volatility in Kenya

KIPPRA in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO–Kenya) and the Ministry of Agriculture held a two day workshop on National Consultation on Policy and Programmatic Actions to Address Food Price Volatility in Kenya at the Kenya School of Monetary Studies from the 8 to 9 October, 2012.

The workshop was opened by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture, Dr. Romano Kiome and graced by the Hon. John Mututho, Chair of the Parliamentary Committee on Agriculture; Hon. Benson Mbai (Member of the Parliamentary Committee on Agriculture); Prof. Micheni Ntiba, Permanent Secretary Ministry of Fisheries; and, Mr Seno Nyakenyanya, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Cooperatives and Market Development, who closed the workshop.

Participants were drawn from the public sector (Ministries of Agriculture, Fisheries, Livestock, Co-operatives and Marketing, Trade and Industrialization, Special programmes, Finance, Planning, National Development and V2030 Treasury, Public Health and Sanitation); parastatals (Kenya Agricultural Research Institute, Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, Kenya Bureau of Standards, National Cereals and Produce Board, Kenya Revenue Authority, and Central Bank of Kenya); development partners (USAID, FAO–ROME, Dutch Embassy, Finnish Embassy, Development partners working group among others); producer associations (Kenya Livestock Producers Association, Kenya National Federation of Agricultural Producers, Cereal Millers Association, and  Kenya Association of Manufacturers); universities (Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology and  University of Nairobi); and international NGOs (Land o’ Lakes, World Food Programme, Catholic Relief Services, and  Oxfam). Others included Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development and Kenya Agricultural Commodity Exchange.

The focus of the workshop was to discuss a Research Report by KIPPRA on food price volatility in Kenya, the policy and programmatic actions to address food price volatility. The study indicated that most commodities in the food basket showed high price volatility at least two to three times annually. The causes of food price volatility in Kenya were identified from two contexts: demand-side constraints and supply-side constraints. Low agricultural productivity and market constraints were the main factors attributed to high price volatility.

The highlight of the workshop was the session in which participants were split into four groups in order to discuss the policy and programmatic actions to address food price volatility in Kenya and provide the way forward. Recommendations from these expert groups were summarised into four areas: Policies to increase production: Availability pillar of food security; Policies to enhance food supplies: Accessibility pillar of food security; Policies to provide social protection/safety nets: Stability pillar of food security; and, Policies to support consumption: Utilization pillar of food security.

You are here: Home View More News and Highlights Addressing Food Price Volatility in Kenya
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